Onion Skin Eggs
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Onion Skin Eggs
Sephardic   -   Huevos Haminados

Makes
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
8  
**
7 hrs  
Yes
These eggs have been a part of Sephardic cuisine for hundreds of years, at least. Called "Haminados" which means "baked" they were originally cooked in the ashes of the bakery oven fires. Today, lacking hot ashes, they are simmered very slowly on the stove top. Despite the shells, color and flavor penetrate through into the yolk. For some alternate names see Note-1.



8
4
1/4
or
1-1/2
1/4
1
ar

c
c

c
c
T
Eggs
Onion Skins
Tea Leaves

Coffee Grounds
Olive Oil
Wine Vinegar, red
Water
  1. Collect a bag of dried Onion Skins over a week or two of cooking. Exact amount is not important, just that there are a lot of them.
  2. Pierce EGGS and place in roomy saucepan. Heap the Onion Skins on top, along with either Tea Leaves or Coffee Grounds as desired. Add Olive Oil, Vinegar and Water to cover well.
  3. Bring Eggs to a boil over high heat, then turn to very low, a bare simmer, for about 6 hours, adding boiling water if needed.
  4. Cool Eggs sufficiently to handle them, tap on a hard surface, then massage the shells gently, just enough to crush them, and peel them.
  5. These Eggs are usually served at the Sabbath meal, for Passover, or may be included as a garnish in salads and the like.
NOTES:
  1. Names:   Italian Jews call these "Turkish Eggs". Greek Jews call them "Salonika Eggs" (Selanlik yamurta) or "Jewish Eggs" (Yahudi yamurta).
  2. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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