Plate of Swedish Hash
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Swedish Hash
Sweden
  -   Pytt i Panna
Makes
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
4 break  
***
1-1/2 hr  
Yes
While Americans tend to associate hash with breakfast, this dish can be served at any time of day. It can be served in various ways (see Note-2 and Note-3).






1
8
5
5
1/2
1-1/2
1-1/2
1/2
1/4
------
ar
#
oz
oz
oz
T
T
T
t
t
---
Potatoes (1)
Beef, cooked
Ham, smoked
Onion
Parsley
Butter
Oil
Salt
Pepper
-- Serve with
Eggs (2).
Prep   -   (20 min)
  1. Dice POTATOES into 1/4 inch cubes. Keep them in cold water until needed.
  2. Dice BEEF and HAM into 1/4 inch cubes. Mix.
  3. Chop ONION fine.
  4. Chop PARSLEY fine.
Run   -   (1 hr - with moderate attention)
  1. Drain Potatoes and dry them as well as you can. I just run them in the salad spinner, but spreading them out on paper towels also works.
  2. In a spacious (12 inch is good) well seasoned skillet, melt Butter and Oil. Fry Potatoes over very moderate heat, turning frequently until golden brown and crispy, then remove them from the pan.
  3. Add a little more butter and oil if needed (it probably will be), then fry Onions until translucent but not at all browned.
  4. Stir in Diced Meat and fry turning often until there is some light browning.
  5. Stir the Potatoes back in until warmed through, then stir in Parsley, Salt and Pepper.
  6. Serve hot on warmed plates, with an Egg for each serving (see Note-2 and Note-3).
NOTES:
  1. Potatoes:   White Rose or Red Potatoes work well here, or some other potato that holds together well. For details see our Potatoes page.
  2. Eggs:   One egg per serving. The traditional way to serve this hash in Sweden is with a raw egg yolk in the half shell (as shown in the photo). This is dumped out and mixed with the hash at the table. Unfortunately, many Americans now distrust "undercooked" eggs, having discovered the egg producers in their region are not actually farmers, but "efficient American businessmen", which means they don't give a shit if you die so long as they can cut costs. Leaving rotting chicken carcasses, mounds of crap and rats on the laying room floor is a great cost cutting measure. Things are a bit different here in "over-regulated, business-unfriendly California", where we use a lot of "undercooked" eggs, but for you folks out there in the Red States I suggest a very well fried egg.
  3. Serving:   For the photo (and my dinner) I served this the "proper" way, as in the photo. Unfortunately I'd broken one yolk, and the next egg had a double yolk, so I had 2/3 cup of egg left over. For breakfast I used the rest of the hash "American style". Heated it in the pan, pushed it out to the edges and fried lightly salted scrambled eggs in the center, then mixed it all. Pretty good that way too.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required, tt=to taste
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