Dish of Pickled Herring
(click to enlarge)

Pickled Herring
Russia
  -   Selyodka Marinovannaya
Serves:
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
6 app  
***
5 days  
Must

A Russian table just isn't complete without herring. Here in Los Angeles we can chose from more than a dozen versions in jars and plastic trays from Lithuania, Latvia, Poland and Russia, but home made is still best - if you can find the herrings.




2-1/2
------
2
1
1/3
------
5
1-1/2
5
4
------
1-1/2
1
24
------
#
---
c
c
c
---
oz
oz


---
t
t

---
Herrings (1)
-- Marinade
Vinegar (2)
Water
Sugar (3)
-- Flavorings
Onion
Carrot
Dried Chili (4)
Bay Leaf
-- Spices
Mustard Seed
Coriander Seed  
Peppercorns
-------

Make   -   (5 days - 1-1/2 hr work)
  1. Clean, skin and fillet HERRINGS as described on our Atlantic Herring page. Soak fillets in plenty of water overnight in the refrigerator.
  2. Cut Fillets diagonally into pieces about 1 inch long.
  3. Put Marinade items in a saucepan and bring to a simmer until the sugar has dissolved. Set aside.
  4. Cut Onions in half lengthwise and slice crosswise fairly thin. Cut Carrot into narrow strips about 1-1/2 inches long. Mix both with Chilis and Bay Leaves.
  5. Mix together all Spices.
  6. In multiple layers pack Herring and Onion Mix fairly tightly in a sterile jar, sprinkling some of the Spices over each layer. Pour Marinade over (see Note-5). Cover tightly and age in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days before serving.
  7. Serve cold with some of the Onions and marinade.
NOTES:
  1. Herring:   These are brine pickled herring - about 3 of them. Find these in markets serving a Russian, Polish or Baltic community. Fresh herring could be used, skipping the soak, but that's not available here in California. For details see our Atlantic Herring page.
  2. Vinegar:   The pattern recipe calls for Cider Vinegar. For the photo I used my favorite vinegar, a natural cane vinegar from the Philippines, which is why it is fairly dark.
  3. Sugar:   The pattern recipe called for 2/3 cup sugar, but I like my herring less sweet.
  4. Dried Chilis:   I use dried Thai chilis which are very hot. For less heat use Japones, or cut down the quantity. For details see our Chili Page.
  5. Method:   This herring becomes very tender when pickled. If you use a jar that has a smaller opening than body it can get badly broken up getting it out of the jar. This happened to me on my first try and I ended up chopping some of the onion and a little of the carrot and mashing it together with the herring to make a spread. Now I pickle it in heat sealed polyethylene bags that I can just cut open.
  6. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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