Bowl of Turkish Lamb Sebzeli
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Lamb & Vegies with Lemon Sauce
Turkey
  -   Sebzeli Terbiyeli Kuzu Haslama
Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
4 main  
***
2-3/4 hr  
Yes
A mildly tart stew with an interesting sauce. Only older cookbooks admit Turks eat meat other than lamb, but lean boneless lamb is very expensive around here, so I use a mix of lamb, veal and beef, or just beef. The pattern recipe used 4 whole bone-in lamb shanks, but cubes of meat work much better for how I serve it.



2
3
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1-1/4
5
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2
2
1
1/2
2
1
1/4
1/4
------
2
5
1
2
#
oz
---
#
oz
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T
T
c
T
c
t
t
---
T
c
t
Lamb meat (1)
Shallots
-- Vegetables
Potatoes (2)
Carrots
-- Sauce
Egg Yolks
Lemon Juice
Flour
Yogurt
Labne (3)
Water
Salt
Pepper
--------
Olive Oil
Water
Salt
Bay Leaves
PREP   -   (20 min)
  1. Cut LAMB into cubes, about 1 inch on a side, removing all excess fat. If you use a mix of meats, cut the beef a bit smaller than lamb or veal for even cooking.
  2. Chop SHALLOTS small.
  3. Peel CARROTS and cut into 1 inch chunks. Peel POTATOES and cut into 3/4 inch cubes. Hold in cold water until needed.
RUN   -   (2-1/4 hr)
  1. In a large coverable sauté pan heat Olive Oil. Stir in Lamb and fry stirring until it has completely lost its raw color and all exuded liquid has evaporated.
  2. Stir in Shallots and fry stirring until softened.
  3. Stir in Water, Salt and Bay Leaves. Water should just cover the meat, adjust if needed. Cover and simmer slowly for about 1-1/4 hours until lamb is tender (1-1/2 hrs for beef).
  4. When Lamb is about done, stir in drained Potatoes and Carrots. Add just enough water to almost cover. Bring back to a boil, then simmer covered for about 20 minutes or until vegetables are tender.
  5. Meanwhile:   Make the Sauce. Whisk together all Sauce Items.
  6. Stir in Sauce a bit at a time, then simmer stirring until the sauce thickens the stew, about 5 minutes. If you need it a bit thicker, bring it to a boil to reduce the sauce, but don't make it too thick because it will thicken more as it cools. If you have way too much liquid you can strain out the solids and reduce the liquid to avoid overcooking. If you get it too thick, you can loosen it with some boiling water.
  7. Serve hot with steamed rice, pilaf or pita bread.
NOTES:
  1. Lamb:   Weight is boneless and with all excess fat removed. Lamb is fairly expensive here, and by time you remove the bones and fat, the meat costs three times that much - so I usually use a mix of lamb, beef and veal, or even all beef. Only some older cookbooks admit that Turks eat anything but lamb.
  2. Potatoes:   White Rose work well for recipes of this kind. Avoid Yukon Gold or similar because they turn to mush if cooked a little long. For details see our Potatoes page.
  3. Labne:   (Kefir Cheese - Turkish Suzme Yogurt) This is yogurt with the water drained out. It is available in any market serving a Near or Middle Eastern community, but you can make your own. Suspend twice as much yogurt as labne needed in double cheese cloth overnight in the fridge.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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