Serving
(click to enlarge)

Sitaw (Bean) Leaves Stir Fry
Philippines
  -   Talbos ng Sitaw
Serves:
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
5 side  
**
45 min  
Yes

Filipino home cooking uses a lot of greens, mostly from the back yard garden. Some, like this one, are not familiar to our North American kitchens. This recipe yields an excellent side dish of greens for either a Philippine or Western menu.



10
2
5
3
-----
2
1
1/3
-----
2
oz
cl
oz

---
T
T
c
---
T
Sitaw Leaves (1)
Garlic
Onion
Red Chilis (2)
-- Sauce
Oyster Sauce (3)
Fish Sauce (4)
Water
-----------
Oil (5)
Prep   -   (20 min)
  1. Strip BEAN LEAVES from the stems, discarding both leaf stems and main stems (except tender tips). Tear to the size you prefer.
  2. Crush and chop GARLIC fine. Quarter ONION lengthwise and slice thin crosswise. Slice CHILIS very thin. Mix all.
  3. Mix all Sauce Items.
RUN   -   (25 min)
  1. Heat OIL in a wok and stir in Garlic Mix. Fry stirring just until garlic starts to color, then stir in Bean Leaves until coated with oil and starting to wilt.
  2. Stir in Sauce Mix and simmer for about 20 minutes - the greens will remain firm.
  3. serve hot with steamed Jasmine rice.
NOTES:
  1. Sitaw Leaves:   [Long Bean Leaves]   Weight is for only leaves and tender shoots, because yield can be very different from bundle to bundle. At my local market, you need about 1-1/4 pounds to yield 10 ounces. My local Philippine market puts out bundles of greens on Friday or Saturday morning to sell through the weekend. For details see our Sitaw (Long Bean) Leaves page.
  2. Chilis:   Control hotness to your taste. Three Fresno Chilis makes it very moderately spicy by Southern California standards. You could also use green chilis. One Chili Serrano will be moderately hot. For details see our Chili Page.
  3. Oyster Sauce:   A standard Chinese sauce used in Southeast Asia for dishes in the Chinese style. Lee Kum Kee Premium brand recommended - it's in a very Chinese looking bottle but it's made in Los Angeles. Yes, it's a lot more expensive, but there's reasons for that (much higher oyster content, unleaded and no melamine).
  4. Fish Sauce:   This clear liquid is as essential to Southeast Asian cuisine as it was to Imperial Rome. For details see our Fish Sauce - Introduction page.
  5. Oil:   The main cooking oil of the Philippines is Coconut Oil. Yes, the AHA (American Heart Association) practically drove this oil out of the country, urging you to use "heart healthy" trans fats instead. As we now know, they could not have been more wrong. For details see our Coconut Oil page.
  6. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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