Serving
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Chili Pepper Adobo
Philippine
  -   Adobong Sili
Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:
4 side  
**
45 min  
Yes
An interesting vegetable side dish or appetizer from the Philippines, mildly tart and quite tasty. How hot is up to the kind of chilis you use (use mild ones - see Note-1). The photo example used the authentic Sili Mahaba, but for those who cannot obtain them, I recommend the much smaller Japanese Schschito peppers, now quite widely available.






12
6
-----
1/3
3
3
1
1/3
1/8
2/3
-----
2
oz
cl
---
c
T
T

t
t
t
---
T
Green Chilis (1)  
Garlic
-- Broth
Vinegar (2)
Soy Sauce
Water
Bay Leaf
Salt
Pepper, black
Sugar
----------
Oil
Prep   -   (15 min)
  1. Rinse CHILIS and dry. Cut the stems just long enough to act as a handle.
  2. Crush GARLIC and chop fine.
  3. Mix all Broth Items.
Run   -   (20 min)
  1. In a spacious sauté pan heat Oil over moderate heat and fry Garlic, stirring until just golden.
  2. Take off heat and stir in the Chilis until well coated with oil.
  3. Stir in Broth mix. Bring to a boil, then turn down and simmer covered until chilis are cooked through but still have some crunch. How long depends on what chilis you use - Shashitos 15 min max, others may take longer. Sample until you have it right.
  4. Serve warm with a main dish (probably not an adobo) and steamed Jasmine rice. As an appetizer, warm is still best, but Shashitos are quite good at room temperature too.
NOTES:
  1. Green Chilis:   In the Philippines mild Sili Mahaba (Long Chili) would be used. These have outstanding flavor in this recipe, but are just now (2015) becoming available in the Philippine markets here in Los Angeles. They may be nearly impossible to get elsewhere. As a substitute, I recommend the wrinkly Japanese Shishito Chilis (available in Korean markets and other sources). Though much smaller, they have a heat range similar to the Mahabas (on average, perhaps a little less). They are also very tasty and attractive in this dish. The local Filipinos do know about these - I've occasionally seen piles of them at a nearby Philippine market. Sweet Italian chilis would probably work, and Spanish Padron peppers, similarly used in Spain, certainly will. The pattern recipe, which used mahaba chilis privately grown in Southern California, suggests Anaheims as a substitute. These have similar flavor but are very different in size. For details see our Chili Page (which includes a linked page on Philippine chilis).
  2. Vinegar:   This should be one of the fine cane vinegars available from Philippine markets. My favorite is Datu Puti brand Sukang Iloco - Native (natural) Vinegar, which is dark in color, but lighter cane vinegars can be used. Coconut vinegar would also work, but lacking these, use distilled white vinegar - not as flavorful and harsher, so use a little less. For details see our Vinegar & Souring Agents page.
  3. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
ssv_cpadob1 120506 pattern from Burnt Lumpia   -   www.clovegarden.com
©Andrew Grygus - agryg@aaxnet.com - Linking to and non-commercial use of this page is permitted.