Dish of Pork with Winged Beans
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Pork with Winged Beans
Philippines
  -   Sigarilyas Gising-gising
Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
2 main  
**
1 hr  
Prep
An interesting and easy to make stew that emphasizes the flavor and texture of Winged Beans. It is substantial and very tasty. Serve with plenty of steamed Jasmine rice. See also Variations.




8
5
5
6
4
2
14
3
1/4
oz
oz
cl
oz

T
oz
T
t
Pork, lean
Onion
Garlic
Winged Beans (1)
Chili, fresh (2)  
Oil
Coconut Milk (3)
Fish Sauce (4)
Pepper, black
Prep   -   (15 min - exclusive of grinding meat)
  1. Trim PORK of any excess fat and grind, if not purchased ground.
  2. Peel ONION and chop medium, Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Mix.
  3. Cut ends from WINGED BEANS and slice crosswise 1/4 inch or a little larger. Slice CHILIS fairly thin (see Note-2). Mix
Run   -   (35 min)
  1. Heat Oil in a coverable wok or sauté pan. Stir in Onion mix and fry stirring just until onions are translucent - then stir in Pork, breaking up any clumps. Fry stirring until pork has completely lost its raw color.
  2. Stir in Coconut Milk and bring to a boil. Stir in Winged Bean mix, bring back to a boil and simmer covered for about 15 minutes.
  3. Uncover. Stir in Fish Sauce and Pepper. Turn up the heat and reduce the Coconut Milk to however you like it, still quite liquid, lightly syrupy as in the photo example, or very syrupy (but not dry). Be careful the coconut milk doesn't brown to the pan.
  4. Serve hot with plenty of steamed Jasmine rice.
NOTES:
  1. Winged Beans:   [Sigarilyas (Philippine)] These are finally becoming available in Asian markets here in Los Angeles (2017). Previously they were only available from Asian growers at farmer's markets, mostly in southern Florida. For details see our Winged Beans page.
  2. Chilis: Both Green and Red chilis are used in the Philippines, both fairly mild and very hot, alone or in combination. If using the long green Sili Mahaba, use about 4 or 5. If using the tiny green or red Siling Labuyo or Thai Chilis, probably 3 would be good. If using more easily available Serranos, one, split in quarters lengthwise and sliced crosswise should be enough. Adjust for your own taste and tolerance, and what chilis are available to you. For details see our Sili - Philippine Chilis page.
  3. Coconut Milk:   Use only unsweetened coconut milk from Thailand or Vietnam, never sweetened. I have found unsweetened coconut milk from Mexico less than ideal.
  4. Fish Sauce   If you are unfamiliar with this essential Southeast Asian ingredient, see our Fish Sauce - Introduction page.
  5. Variations:   Shrimp, small or coarsely chopped are often included. These should go in at the end of cooking. For flavoring, I chose Fish Sauce as being most available to North American kitchens. In the Philippines Bangoon Alamang (shrimp paste) is often used, alone or combined with Fish Sauce. Unfortunately, much Philippine Shrimp Paste is dyed florescent pink, unappetizing to non-Filipinos. For details see our Shrimp Sauce / Paste page.
  6. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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