Serving
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Spicy Ground Pork
Thailand
  -   Phat Khi Mao Mu
Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
3 main  
**
30 min  
Prep
A popular meaty dish with a bit of chili bite. It could also be made with Chicken, in which case it would be Phat Khi Mao Kai. Serve with plenty of steamed Jasmine rice. I serve with Chili Vinegar Sauce on the side so it can be spiced up a bit more - the Thai chilis around here are sometimes disappointingly mild.



1
5
1
5
1/2
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2
1
1
1/4
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2
#
cl
oz

c
---
T
T
t
c
---
T
Pork, lean
Garlic
Cilantro Roots (1)
Thai Chili (2)
Thai Basil Leaf (3)  
--Sauce
Fish Sauce (4)
Oyster Sauce (5)
Palm Sugar
Stock
---------
Oil
Prep   -   (15 min)
  1. Grind PORK or chop very fine (more authentic but much more tedious).
  2. Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Chop CILANTRO ROOTS (or stems - see Note-1. Chop CHILIS fine. Mix all and pound to paste in a mortar.
  3. Remove BASIL LEAVES from stems (measure is loosely packed). Set to soaking in cold water (keeps them green longer).
  4. Mix all Sauce items.
Run   -   (15 min)
  1. In a spacious sauté pan or wok heat Oil moderately hot and fry Garlic mix until Garlic starts to color. Turn heat to very high and stir in Pork. Fry stirring until all traces of the raw color are gone.
  2. Stir in Sauce mix, and toss until it comes to a boil.
  3. When ready to serve, take off the heat. Drain Basil Leaves and stir them in.
  4. Serve immediately with plenty of steamed Jasmine rice.
NOTES:
  1. Cilantro Roots:   These are hard to get even here in Los Angeles. Even the farmer's markets rarely have them, so we often have to substitute and use cilantro stems (no leaves) instead.
  2. Thai Chilis:   These are pretty hot, but small. If you don't have them substitute 2 or 3 (your best judgement) Serranos, which are not quite as hot but a lot larger. For details see our Chili Page.
  3. Basil   This should be Thai purple Basil (it's just the stems that are purple), not the light green Lemon Basil which is for salads. If you don't have Thai, regular basil is a reasonable substitute. For details on types of basil see our Basil Page.
  4. Fish Sauce:   This clear liquid is as essential to Southeast Asian cuisine as it was to Imperial Rome. For details see our Fish Sauce - Introduction page.
  5. Oyster Sauce:   A standard Chinese sauce used in Southeast Asia for dishes in the Chinese style. Lee Kum Kee Premium brand recommended - it's in a very Chinese looking bottle but it's made in Los Angeles. Yes, it's a lot more expensive, but there's reasons for that (much higher oyster content, unleaded and no melamine).
  6. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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