Serving
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Pork, Shrimp & Bamboo Adobo
Philippine
  -   Adobong Labong
Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
4 w/rice  
***
1-1/4 hr  
Yes
A rich, complex and mildly tart dish from the Philippines, with contrasting flavors and textures. It's a little more complex than many Philippine adobos, but still very easy to make. This recipe serves four with rice, and will serve 6 or 7 Asian style with several other dishes.




8
8
14
5
5
------
2/3
2
1/2
1/4
------
2
1/4
oz
oz
oz
oz
cl
---
c
T
t
t
---
T
c
Pork (1)
Shrimp
Bamboo Shoots (2)  
Onion
Garlic
--Broth
Stock, Chicken
Fish Sauce
Salt
Pepper, black  
--------
Oil
Vinegar (3)
Prep   -   (30 min)
  1. Chop PORK very fine.
  2. Peel and devein SHRIMP. Cut in half if very large.
  3. Slice BAMBOO SHOOTS about 1/8 inch thick and 1-1/2 by 1/2 inch or whatever you can work out.
  4. Chop ONION small. Crush GARLIC and chop small. Mix.
  5. Mix together all Broth items.
Run   -   (35 min)
  1. Heat Oil in a spacious sauté pan and fry Onion Mix stirring until lightly browned, scraping up the fond so the garlic doesn't stick. Stir in Pork and fry stirring until lightly browned, being careful the fond adhering to the pan doesn't get too dark.
  2. At this point, if you've chopped your own pork, you should be ready to go, but if you used commercial ground pork you probably have excess fat and need to pour most of it off.
  3. Stir in Broth mix and Bamboo Shoots. Bring to a boil and simmer uncovered for about 3 minutes, scraping up the fond.
  4. Stir in Vinegar and simmer until sauce is reduced by about half, about 15 minutes, stirring in Shrimp for the last 8 minutes.
  5. Check seasoning and serve with steamed Jasmine rice.
NOTES:
  1. Pork:   Weight is for skinless, boneless and all excess fat trimmed. Chopped fine is best, but ground will work.
  2. Bamboo Shoots:   Weight is drained weight. Best are fresh from a tub, or in the new plastic vacuum bags. Canned can be used, but par boil them a few minutes to remove some of the canned flavor.
  3. Vinegar:   This should be one of the fine vinegars available from Philippine markets. The photo specimen was made with Coconut Vinegar, but Palm or Cane vinegar could also be used. Lacking the real thing, use white wine vinegar, or if lacking that, distilled white vinegar - not as flavorful and a bit harsher so use a touch less. For details see our Sours page.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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