Serving
(click to enlarge)

Pork & Water Spinach Adobo
Philippine
  -   Adobong Kangkong
Serves:
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
2 w/rice  
***
1-1/4 hr  
Part

This delicious dish has an almost smoky flavor, very worthy of being more widely adopted. Unfortunately, Water Spinach is a controlled substance in many US states. Fortunately, it is widely available in California, grown by licensed farms and transportable without a permit.



10
1
6
5
------
1
2
1/4
------
1-1/2
1/4
1/4
1/8
oz
#
oz
cl
---
c

c
---
T
c
t
t
Pork lean
Ong Choy (1)  
Onion
Garlic
-- Sauce
Stock
Bay Leaf
Soy Sauce
---------
Oil
Vinegar (2)
Salt
Pepper
PREP   -   (35 min)
  1. Slice PORK into chunks about 1/2 inch thick and 3/4 inches square.
  2. Pinch Leaves from ONG CHOY stems, leaving the leaf stems attached to the main stems. Discard any stem pieces more than 1/4 inch diameter and cut all stems, including leaf stems, into lengths of about 1-1/2 inch. Keep separate from the leaves.
  3. Dice ONION small. Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Mix.
  4. Mix all Sauce items
RUN   -   (40 min)
  1. Heat Oil fairly hot in a wok (you'll need the space) and stir in Onion mix. Fry stirring until just translucent.
  2. Stir in Pork. Fry stirring until pork loses its raw color and starts to brown, being careful not to burn the Garlic.
  3. Stir in Stock mix, bring to a boil and simmer covered until Pork is tender, about 20 minutes.
  4. Add Vinegar. Simmer 5 minutes without stirring.
  5. Stir in Ong Choy Stems and bring back to a simmer. Simmer covered, stirring occasionally until Ong Choy stems are tender (about 4 minutes - the larger ones should remain a bit crisp).
  6. Stir in the Ong Choy Leaves and bring back to a simmer for about 1 minute.
  7. Season to taste with Salt and Pepper.
  8. Serve hot with plenty of steamed Jasmine rice.
NOTES:
  1. Water Spinach:   In California this vegetable can be found in markets serving Southeast Asian communities, generally sold as "Ong Choy". It's sold in bundles weighing between 1 and 2 pounds. For details see our Water Spinach page.
  2. Vinegar:   The Philippines are the center for vinegar cuisine so they have many fine varieties of cane, palm, and coconut vinegars. My favorite is Datu Puti brand Sukang Iloco Native Vinegar, a dark, natural sugar cane vinegar. If you don't have Philippine, use a good rice vinegar. For details see our Sours page.
  3. Prep Time   This is mostly for dealing with the the leaves and stems of the water spinach. It can be as much as 45 minutes for a difficult bunch.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
smm_porkongc1 110722 inet   -   www.clovegarden.com
©Andrew Grygus - agryg@aaxnet.com - Linking to and non-commercial use of this page is permitted.