Serving
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Pork Stir Fry with Luffa, Carrot
Indonesia    
Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
3 w/rice  
***
40 min  
Prep
A light, simple and delicious stir fry, suitable for informal and weekday dinners. Unlike squash, luffa holds its shape rather than getting mushy. The pattern recipe was by a lady who recognized the taste of luffa from her childhood, and called her Indonesian mother for the recipe. The majority culture of Indonesia would have to use chicken rather than pork.




7
14
3
1
2
2
1
2/3
1-1/2
1/2
1/4
oz
oz
oz
oz
cl
oz
T
c
T
t
t
Pork, lean (1)
Luffa (2)
Carrot
Shallot
Garlic
Bean Threads
Oil
Stock (3)
Fish Sauce (4)
Salt
Pepper
Prep   -   (20 min)
  1. Slice PORK about 1/8 inch thick, then into strips about 1/2 inch wide by 1 inch long.
  2. Peel LUFFA. Quarter lengthwise and cut into slices 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick.
  3. Peel CARROT and slice thin diagonally.
  4. Cut SHALLOT in half lengthwise and slice fine crosswise. Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Mix.
  5. Soak BEAN THREADS in warm water until softened. Drain, set on cutting board and make about 3 cuts through the pile and 3 cuts at right angles for more manageable lengths.
Run   -   (20 min)
  1. In a wok or spacious sauté pan heat Oil. Stir in Shallot mix until aromatic (about 35 seconds).
  2. Stir in Carrots and fry stirring for about 1-1/2 minutes.
  3. Stir in Pork and fry stirring until it has completely lost its raw color.
  4. Stir in Luffa and tumble until evenly distributed. Stir in Bean Threads, then Stock, Fish Sauce, Salt and Pepper. Bring to a boil, set to a simmer, cover and simmer, stirring now and then, until Luffa is tender (about 5 minutes). The dish should finish with a fair amount of liquid, adjust as needed.
  5. Serve hot with steamed Jasmine rice.
NOTES:
  1. Pork:   Weight is boneless, with all excess fat removed.
  2. Luffa:   [Oyong (Indonesia); Sing Qua (China)]   This may be angled luffa, sold around here as "Chinese Okra" or smooth luffa (if you can get it). The pattern recipe used an angled luffa, but I prefer smooth luffa, which is easier to work with. I get it at the Asian markets here in Los Angeles. For details see our Luffa page.
  3. Stock:   Chicken or Pork Stock work fine. You could also use plain Water, as the fish sauce will give it some complexity.
  4. Fish Sauce:   This clear liquid is as essential to Southeast Asian cuisine as it was to Imperial Rome. If you are unfamiliar with it, see our Fish Sauce - Introduction page.
  5. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
smm_pigluf1 161109 Asian Grandmother's Cookbook   -   www.clovegarden.com
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