Serving
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Pork & Chinese Broccoli
Thai Style

Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
3 main  
***
1 hr  
Prep
While Gai Lan (Chinese broccoli) is more often associated with beef, this pork recipe is just delicious. I say "Thai Style" because the recipe originated from a lady in Ohio, but the ingredients and methods are proper for a Thai dish in the Chinese style.






1
14
------
1-1/2
2
1
2
------
5
8
5
------
2
2
2
1
1
------
2-1/2
3
#
oz
---
T
t
T
T
---
oz
cl

---
T
T
t
T
T
---
T
T
Gai Lan (1)
Pork, lean (2)
-- Marinade
Cornstarch
Soy Sauce
Rice Wine (3)
Fish Sauce
---------
Shallots
Garlic
Thai Chili (4)
-- Sauce
Stock
Fish Sauce
Soy Sauce
Oyster Sauce
Palm Sugar (5)
---------
Oil
Lime Juice
Prep   -   (45 minutes)
  1. Slice PORK into strips about 1/8 inch thick, 1/4 inch wide and 1-1/2 inches long. Cut with the grain so the strips hold together.
  2. Mix all Marinade Items and massage into the pork. Let stand for at least 20 minutes, then set in a strainer to drain thoroughly, reserving the liquid to add to the sauce mix.
  3. Strip leaves and tender tops from GAI LAN. Cut leaves into fairly large pieces. Slice stems (including leaf stems) on a shallow diagonal starting at about 1/2 inch at the big end and increasing to about 1-1/2 inches at the thin end. Keep leaves and stems separate.
  4. Cut Shallots in half lengthwise, then slice very thin crosswise.
  5. Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Slice CHILIS very thin. Mix.
  6. Mix together all Sauce items along with the reserved Marinade.
  7. Squeeze LIME JUICE.
Run   -   (10 minutes)
  1. In a wok or spacious sauté pan heat Oil and fry Shallots until they start to color.
  2. Spread out shallots and spread drained Pork over them. Let sit for a minute, then add the Garlic mix. Stir it all up. Fry stirring over high heat until pork loses all its raw color and any exuded liquid has evaporated.
  3. Stir in Gai Lan Stems. Fry stirring over moderate heat for about 3 minutes, making sure you don't burn the coating stuck to the wok - it's part of the recipe.
  4. Stir in Gai Lan Leaves until coated with oil, then stir in Sauce mix, cover and simmer until thick stems are crisp tender and still a bit crunchy. Tumble a couple times and scrap up the coating from the wok.
  5. Turn off heat and stir in Lime Juice.
  6. Serve hot with plenty of steamed Jasmine rice.
NOTES:
  1. Gai Lan:   This green looks much like Italian Rapini, but in an odd reversal it's actually broccoli, while Rapini is turnip greens. Most other Asian "cabbages" are actually turnip greens. For details see our Chinese Broccoli page.
  2. Pork:   Weight is for boneless pork with all excess fat removed.
  3. Rice Wine:   Use a drinkable grade of Chinese rice wine (the cooking versions are heavily salted and rather awful). If you don't have the rice wine use a dry sherry (sake is not considered a good substitute). For details see our Chinese Rice Winde page.
  4. Thai Chili:   Red or green (same heat). Five, just under 2 inches long, make this dish "satisfyingly spicy" by Southern California standards. Fresh Arbols, (about 3) are a good substitute, or 2 Serranos (much larger). Vary the quantity depending on the tolerance of your guests and hotness of your chilis. If some can't take the heat go light on the chilis and serve with Thai Chili Vinegar Sauce. For details see our Chili Page.
  5. Palm Sugar:   If you don't have palm sugar use a light turbinado or similar sugar. Palm is similar but tastier.
  6. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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