Serving
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Beef Adobo
Philippine   -   Adobong Carne
Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
2 main  
***
10 hrs  
Yes
While made less often than chicken and pork adobo in the Filipino household, this is also a worthy dish. It won't, however, serve many per pound of meat, so Filipinos often add taro or potato. The strong flavors of this dish can easily support that, and I actually prefer it that way. See our recipe Beef Adobo with Potatoes.






2
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3
1/2
3
2
1/2
1/2
1/4
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2
1/3
#
---
cl
in

c
c
t
T
---
T
c
Beef, lean (1)
-- Marinade
Garlic
Ginger Root
Chili, Thai (2)
Bay Leaves
Vinegar (3)
Soy Sauce
Pepper, blk
--------
Oil
Water
Prep   -   (8 hrs - 20 min work)
  1. Cut BEEF into cubes about 1-1/2 inches on a side or as desired.
  2. Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Slice GINGER very thin and slice into threads. Stem CHILIS and split open. Combine all Marinade items in a non-reactive bowl, then massage into Beef. Marinate overnight in the fridge or 4 hours at a cool room temperature, tumbling now and then.
Run   -   (1-1/2 to 2 hrs depending)
  1. Drain Beef well, retaining all the marinade.
  2. In a spacious coverable sauté pan or wok, heat Oil and fry Beef, tumbling often until it is lightly browned all over.
  3. Stir in Marinade and 1.3 c Water. Bring to a boil, cover tightly and simmer until beef is tender, 3/4 to 1 hour depending on cut.
  4. Uncover and simmer down until you have the desired consistency. I prefer a fair amount of liquid if served with rice, otherwise, use your own judgement. Some Filipinos simmer down so dry it begins to fry.
  5. Serve hot with plenty of steamed Jasmine rice.
NOTES:
  1. Beef:   Weight is for lean beef with any bones or excess fat removed. I prefer chuck (shoulder) but round or any other of the more flavorful cuts will work. Cooking time will be affected depending on cut, and prep time depending on how much trimming you have to do.
  2. Chili:   The proper chili would be Siling-Labuyo, a very small very hot Philippine chili. Unfortunately these have become scarce even in the Philippines. Growers have switched to larger, easier to harvest chilis similar to the Thai chilis we have here. These are sometimes of disappointing heat.
  3. Vinegar:   Preferably use a high quality Philippine cane, palm or coconut vinegar. Lacking those, rice or cider vinegar can be used. For details see our Sours page.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required, tt=to taste
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