Serving
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Shrimp with Chayote Greens
Malay / California

Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
2 main  
**
50 min  
Prep
Chayote leaves are delicious, though a little coarse, and very popular throughout Southeast Asia. I started from a recipe by a lady originally from Penang Island, Malaysia. I made changes, and while they are all consistent with Southeast Asian practices and similar recipes, I call it "Malay / California". This recipe will serve as a main dish for two or a side dish for 4, suitable for Asian or Western menus.



6
12
3
2
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1-1/2
2/3
1
1/2
1/3
------
2
------
oz
oz
cl

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T
c
T
t
t
---
T
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Shrimp
Chayote Greens (1)  
Garlic
Chili, red (2)
-- Sauce
Rice Wine (3)
Stock, Shrimp or Chicken
Fish Sauce (4)
Salt
Sugar (opt) (5)
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Oil
-- Garnish
Shallot Crisps
Prep   -   (30 min)
  1. Shell SHRIMP.
  2. Strip leaves and tender tips from Chayote Greens, discarding the stems (see Note-1). Tear leaves and stems to the size you desire.
  3. Crush GARLIC and chop fine.
  4. Seed CHILIS and slice into threads or thin rings.
Run   -   (20 min)
  1. Heat oil in a wok or spacious sauté pan and fry Garlic until shows a touch of color.
  2. Stir in Shrimp, Chili and Chayote Greens until greens are coated with oil and starting to wilt.
  3. Stir in Stock and Salt. Cover and simmer for about 15 minutes (the greens remain a bit firm).
  4. Serve with plenty of steamed Jasmine rice.
NOTES:
  1. Chayote Greens:   Weight is after stripping from tough stems. As sold here in Los Angeles you'll need a bunch weighing almost twice this weight. I include the tendrils (dragon whiskers), though that makes the texture a bit more coarse. Chayote Greens can be found (irregularly) in large Philippine market (of which we have many here in Southern California). For details see our Chayote page.
  2. Chilis:   Around here we all use Fresnos, but Holland Red or similar will do fine. Actually, two Fresnos make this just a tad too mild - use your own best judgement. For details see our Chili Page.
  3. Rice Wine:   Use a good, drinkable Chinese rice wine, not that horrid salted "cooking" version. If you don't have this, use a Dry Sherry. Sake is made from rice but is not considered a good substitute. For details see our Chinese Rice Wine page.
  4. Fish Sauce:   This clear liquid is as essential to Southeast Asian cuisine as it was to Imperial Rome. For details see our Fish Sauce - Introduction page.
  5. Sugar   The touch of sugar is optional, but will counter the slight bitterness of my rather large amount of greens for people sensitive to bitter.
  6. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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