Serving
(click to enlarge)

Chicken Gizzards with Green Bananas
Puerto Rico
  -   Escabeche de guineos y mollejas
Serves:
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
3 main  
***
1-1/2 hrs  
Most

This salad (or appetizer) is very popular in Puerto Rico and among Puerto Ricans in North America. It deserves to be better known among non-Puerto Ricans. Of course, as with all popular traditional dishes it's variously made. This recipe is based closely on one by a real Puerto Rican lady.



1
3
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10
1/3
4
1/2
1-1/4
1/2
1/2
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#
#
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oz
c

c
c
t
t
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Chicken Gizzards (1)  
Plantains, green (2)
-- Marinade
Onions
Capers
Bay Leaves
Wine Vinegar, white
Olive Oil (3)
Pepper
Salt
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MAKE   -   (50 minutes (30 min work))
  1. Clean GIZZARDS as needed and cut apart the two lobes. Cut each lobe in half crosswise.
  2. Put Gizzards in a sauce pan. Bring just to a boil, then cover and simmer slowly for about 2-1/4 hours or until tender. Drain and let cool.
  3. Peel Plantains. Put in a pot with plenty of salted water and bring to a boil. Set to a simmer. Pierce one with a sharp skewer so you know what it feels like raw. Simmer for about 25 minutes and check with the skewer for doneness (there should be no stiff center). Do not overcook. Drain and let cool.
  4. Cut ONION in half lengthwise and slice thin crosswise. Mix together all Marinade items.
  5. Mix Gizzards and Plantains into Marinade. Let it marinate overnight or so in the fridge, turning now and then. I just bag it with all the air squeezed out so I can just turn the bag now and then.
  6. Let it warm until just cool before serving.
NOTES:
  1. Chicken Gizzards:   Look for these in markets serving ethnic communities (just about any eth except North Americans). As sold here in California they are peeled, cleaned and ready to cook. Some recipes call for "scraping off the hard green and yellow stuff" which is completely unnecessary here.
  2. Plantain:   These are the big cooking bananas you see in markets serving a Latin or Southeast Asian community. They should be green, starting to show some yellow, but yellow showing some brown may be too soft. Note that in Puerto Rico a much smaller variety of starchy green cooking bananas may be used,
  3. Olive Oil:   With so much oil, Extra Virgin is likely to be too strong. I use Pure Olive Oil (sometimes labeled just "Olive Oil"). Using some Virgin oil mixed in probably wouldn't hurt.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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