Hungarian Fresh Dumplings:
Tarhonya, Csipetke, Galuska
& Noodles




2
2
1/2
c

t
Flour
Eggs, Large
Salt

  1. Sift Flour, mix in Eggs and Salt. Knead to make a stiff dough. If it's too crumbly to form a ball add just a touch of cold water. Use care, the dough needs to be be just moist enough to form a ball, but not at all sticky.
  2. Form into two or three balls and let rest for about 3/4 hour, covered with plastic so they don't dry out.
  3. Shape and cut to one of the forms shown below.
  4. Cook in boiling salted water as for any pasta, but for time appropriate to the shape. DO NOT depend on the old "if they float they're almost done" rule - you need to sample them.

Of course, I let my big Kitchenaid stand mixer and it's dough hook do all the heavy work, and I know just what the dough should look like in the bowl when it's had enough water.

Note that Tarhonya are usually used fresh or dried, but Csipetke and definitely Galuska are used fresh. You can make these ahead. Par boil about 30 seconds in rapidly boiling water, then drain, bag and refrigerate. They will keep for 4 days or so and be ready for final cooking when needed. After the par-boil they can also be frozen. You will find much more about making fresh pasta on our Italian Fresh & Stuffed Pasta page (Italy isn't far from Hungary).


Fresh Tarhonya
(click to enlarge)

Tarhonya   -   [Egg Barley, Rivilchas]
Tarhonya is a typical Hungarian pasta you can easily make fresh - or you can make a lot of it and dry it. Hungarian families once made tarhonya by the sack full in August when it would sun dry well, then used it over the winter. Tarhonya is often fried in butter or bacon fat until golden before adding to soup.

  1. Grate dough balls on the coarse side of a grater. Don't let them pile up or they may stick together - spread on a baking sheet.
  2. Let dry on a towel for 1/2 hour before using, shuffling occasionally for even drying.
  3. Cook in plenty of salted water and give them about 7 minutes after the water comes back to a boil to become tender all the way through. Strain them out and tumble with a few drops of butter or olive oil to keep them from sticking together.
  4. DRIED: spread out on cloth and sun dry or spread on baking sheets and dry in a barely warm oven. Shuffle occasionally for even drying.
Fresh Csipetke
(click to enlarge)

Csipetke
Csipetke is a fresh pasta often used in stews. Some recipes call for rolling the dough thin before pinching off, but I much prefer the Magyar campfire texture you get from pinching off the ball.

  1. Take a dough ball and pinch off pieces smaller than a dime and pinched quite thin.
  2. Let dry on a towel for 1/2 hour before using, shuffling occasionally for even drying.
  3. Cook in plenty of salted water and give them about 10 to 15 minutes after the water comes back to a boil to become tender all the way through and float up to the surface. Strain them out and tumble with a few drops of olive oil to keep them from sticking together.
Fresh Galuska
(click to enlarge)

Galuska   -   [Soft Dumplings]
An essential dumpling for many Hungarian dishes. It is said that if you can't make galuska you can't cook Hungarian - but I can't see how anyone would be unable to make these.

  1. Roll dough balls out to between 1/4 and 1/2 inch thick and then cut with the edge of a spoon or some such device to make irregular pieces about 1 x 3/8 x 3/8 inch or as you like.
  2. Spread out on a towel and let dry for about 1/2 hour, shuffling occasionally for even drying.
  3. Bring plenty of salted water to a boil. Dump in a galuska, bring back to a boil and keep at a fast simmer until they are done. This can be anywhere from 30 minutes to over 1 hour depending on shape and thickness. Strain them out and tumble in a bowl with a little melted butter or a few drops of oil so they don't stick together.
Fresh Noodles
(click to enlarge)

Tészta
Noodles are now used in a great many Hungarian dishes, cut into many sizes.

  1. Roll dough balls out as thin as you can on a floured board and let dry for a little while. Slice to the desired width, which may be wide or may be as narrow as you can cut it, or may be small squares.
  2. Spread out on a towel or hang over a pin or wire (depending on shape) and let dry for about 1/2 hour, shuffling occasionally for even drying if on a towel sheet.
NOTES:
  1. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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