Serving
(click to enlarge)

Goat or Mutton Gongura Curry
India - Andhra
  -   Gongura Mamsam
Serves:
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
2 main  
***
1.3 hr  
Most

This is one of the most popular dishes among those people of Andhra Pradesh who are not vegetarian. Gongura is also much used in the vegetarian cuisine of the region.





1-1/2
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3/4
3
1/2
1/4
2/3
1
2
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1-1/2
1
2
2
2/3
1-1/2
1-1/2
1
#
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c
cl
in
t
t
t
T
---
c
#

t
t
T
c
t
Goat (1)
-- Marinade
Yogurt
Garlic
Ginger
Turmeric
Salt
Chili powder (2)
Lemon Juice
--------
Gongura (3)
Onion
Chili, green (4)  
Coriander Seed
Cumin seed
Oil
Water
Garam Masala (5)

Prep   (40 min)
  1. Cut GOAT into about 1 inch cubes.
  2. Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Slice GINGER very thin and chop fine. Pound them both to paste in a mortar if possible. Mix together all Marinade items.
  3. Massage Marinade into Goat and set aside for at least 1/2 hour.
  4. Remove GONGURA LEAVES from stems (see Note-3). Leave whole or chop very coarse as you wish.
  5. Chop ONION fine. Split CHILIS open lengthwise. Mix.
  6. Grind Cumin and Coriander together.
Run   (2-1/2 hr)
  1. In a spacious sauté pan, heat Oil and fry Onion mix, stirring until translucent but not browned.
  2. Stir in Goat with marinade, the Spice mix, then Water. Bring to a boil, cover tightly and simmer until Goat is almost tender (2 to 2-1/2 hours depending on how ornery your goat was),
  3. Stir in Gongura, adjust liquid if needed, and simmer another 1/2 hour or until Goat is fully tender.
  4. Adjust liquid to the amount you desire, by adding water or simmering uncovered. For serving with rice there should be plenty of liquid.
  5. Sprinkle on Garam Masala and serve hot with plenty of steamed long grain rice.
NOTES:
  1. Goat / Mutton:   Goat is the most common meat in India, but the British called it "Mutton" during the Raj, thinking goat below their station. Mutton is a good substitute but neither Goat nor Mutton is common in most of North America. Use Lamb if you can't get either. Weight is for boneless with all excess fat removed.
  2. Chili Powder:   Reshampatti would be an appropriate powder - it's fairly hot, but this dish is supposed to be rather hot - in fact hotter than I have given it here. Use your own best judgement. For details see our Chili Page.
  3. Gongura / Kenaf:   This member of the mallow family is now reasonably available in parts of North America where there are Indian or Persian communities. It tastes much like sorrel. Use only grean leaf, not even leaf stems. This is a fiber crop - stems are far too tough to eat. To get 4 ounces (1-3/4 cups tight packed) you will need to start with about a 10 ounce bunch. For details see our Kenaf - Gongura page.
  4. Chili:   2 Serranos will make this dish very moderately hot (or perhaps distressingly hot if you're from the Frozen North). Use your own best judgement. For details see our Chili Page.
  5. Garam Masala   A Southern GM would be appropriate here (see our recipe for Tamilnadu Garum Masala for an expample) but a Northern one will do in a pinch. Some recipes omit the Garum Masala.
  6. Method:   Most (but not all) Indian recipes for this dish make it in a pressure cooker. These are very popular in India where fuel is scarce and expensive because cooking time is shorter, but they have long been out of style in North America. Since most households here don't have one, I use a stovetop method.
  7. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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