Paste

Mustard Paste
India - Bengal
  -   Shorshe Bata
Traditionally this paste is ground with a Sil and Batta, similar to the Mexican Metate y Mano (Aztec blender). Unfortunately the texture produced by this method cannot be exactly duplicated with common household machinery. For details see our Mortar & Pestel & Grinding Stones page.




1/3
2
1/2
3
c

t
T
Mustard Seed (1)
Chili, green (2)
Salt
Water
Revised Traditional Method
  1. Soak MUSTARED SEEDS in warm water a minimum of 6 hours. Drain well.
  2. Chop CHILIS small.
  3. Place Mustard Seeds and Chilis in a blender and blend to a smooth paste, which will be flecked with brown and green (see Note-5).
  4. Stored in a tightly closed jar in the refrigerator it will keep for a few days, but gradually becomes more bitter (see Note-6).


1/4
2
1/2

c

t
Dijon Mustard (3)
Chili, green (2)
Salt
Quick Method #1
Not as good as the traditional method, but acceptable if you are in a hurry.
  1. Mix All Items and run in a blender until smooth.


1/4
2
1
1
6
c

in
t
T
Mustard Powder (4)  
Chili, green
Ginger root
Salt
Water
Quick Method #2
This is a new method being used since mustard powder is now a common item in Bengal.
  1. Mix All Items together in a blender and blend until it is a smooth paste. Let rest for 10 minutes before using for the flavor to develop.
NOTES:
  1. Mustard Seed:   The mustard seed used in India is black (actually, very dark brown), not yellow. Bong Mom's Cookbook does suggest using yellow seeds if you want to cut the sharpness a bit, and further suggests replacing some mustard seed with white poppy seed if you need it even less sharp.
  2. Chili:   Indian cookbooks always specify "green chilis" without giving any hint as to size or hotness. I use 2 Chilis Serranos with good results. The green chilis are supposed to keep the paste from being bitter.
  3. Dijon Mustard:   This is from the Bengali Five Spice Chronicles, which suggests using Grey Poupon for best results, some Dijon's are harsher.
  4. Mustard Powder   This is from the Bengali Five Spice Chronicles, which specifies imported Indian powdered mustard, Swad brand or similar. The results probably wouldn't be the same with Colman's.
  5. Grinding:   I was not satisfied with the result of mechanical processing, so I ground it medium, then gave it a good pounding in my big Thai granite mortar. Not as efficient or effective as a Sil and Batta, but it worked reasonably well.
  6. Storage:   It is possible a little vinegar may stop this mustard from getting bitter, as is done with Western prepared mustard, but they don't use vinegar in India except in the former Portuguese colony of Goa.
  7. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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