Serving
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Prussian Meat Dumplings
Germany
  -   Königsberger Klopse
Makes:
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
35 balls  
****
2-1/4 hr  
Yes

These are a popular main course in Berlin, and formerly in East Prussia (Königsberg), but Prussia no longer exists, see (Note-3). This dish works very well as part of a buffet (make plenty, they'll go fast) or as appetizers - a bit of a hassle to make but worth it.




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2
ar
1/2
1/2
1/2
6
5
2
2
2
2/3
1/4
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4
------
1
1-1/2
2
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#
#
#
oz

T
T
lg
t
t
---
c
---
T
T
T
-- Meatballs
Dinner Rolls, stale
Water
Beef, lean ground
Veal, lean ground
Pork, lean ground
Onion
Anchovy fillets
Parsley
Lemon Zest
Eggs
Salt
Pepper
----------
Stock
-- Sauce
Butter
Flour
Capers
Option (2)
  1. Break up ROLLS and soak in Water for 15 minutes, then drain and squeeze as dry as possible.
  2. Grind MEATS fine if not already ground - see Note-1.
  3. Chop ONION and PARSLEY fine. Grate LEMON ZEST. Mix together All Meatball items and run the mix through the meat grinder again.
  4. Set out a foil and oil it as a holding surface. Oil your hands liberally with olive oil and form the Mix into balls. Toss them back and forth between your hands, gently squeezing into shape between tosses. If they start to stick rinse your hands, dry them on a paper towel, take a swig of your beer, re-oil and continue. These meatballs are quite tender so should be no larger than 1-1/2 inches. Keep the balls as close to the same size as possible for even cooking.
  5. Bring Stock to a boil. Drop in a couple of balls to make sure they come out well, then do them all in batches so they're not too crowded. After the stock comes back to a boil give them another 12 minutes to cook through. Add water between batches to keep the level up.
  6. When all balls are done, adjust liquid so you have about 3 cups for a thin sauce, 2 cups for a thick sauce. I prefer it a bit thin, as in the photo, but it depends on how you intend to serve it.
  7. In a skillet, melt butter over very moderate heat, then stir in flour and continue to fry gently, stirring continuously until it is the color of the lighter caramel cubes in a bag of candy. Slowly stir in some of the stock until smooth and creamy, then stir all into stock. Bring to a simmer, stirring frequently, for a few minutes to thicken.
  8. Add Capers to the sauce, then gently stir in the meatballs and simmer another 2 minutes.
  9. This dish is traditionally served with sauerkraut. For typical recipes see Sauerkraut with Apples and Sauerkraut with Apples and Wine.
NOTES:
  1. Meat:   Ratios and types of meat may vary, but pork may not be omitted or it just isn't German.
  2. Option:   In Bavaria, but not much elsewhere in Germany, 3 T of Sour Cream would be stirred into the sauce just before serving.
  3. Prussia:   This Baltic country was inhabited by a people closely related to the Lithuanians and speaking a similar language. The Pagan Prussians were brutally attacked time and again by the Teutonic Knights, a Catholic military order from Germany - until they converted to Christianity. After conversion they continued to be brutally attacked by the Teutonic Knights, who established their main bastion in northern East Prussia. Eventually the Poles and Lithuanians turned the Knights into sausage, but by then there were no Prussians left. The now German Kingdom of Prussia became a military super-power, taking over most of northern Germany and much of Poland, but after WWII their empire was partitioned into German States, Poland, Russian occupied Kaliningrad (northern East Prussia) and Lithuania. So the real Prussians are extinct, and German Prussia is only a name.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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