Serving
(click to enlarge)

Chicken Fricassee
Czech
  -   Kure Zadelávané
Serves:
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
5 main  
****
3 hrs  
Yes

This Czech chicken dish is intensely flavorful but a little bit of a production (it needs more than the usual attention during cooking), so is best used for special occasions. It can be made ahead right up to the last minute, which can be finished after bringing back to a simmer. This dish goes very well with steamed white rice.





2-1/2
ar
------
5
2-1/2
3
8
------
4
1
1
1
3
1/4
1/16
1-1/2
2
2
2
1
#

---
oz
oz
oz
oz
---
oz
T

T
T
t
t
c
T
T
T
Chicken meat (1)
Salt
-- Root Vegetables
Onion
Carrot
Parsnip
Celery Root (2)
--------
Mushrooms
Butter
Lemon
Parsley
Lard or Butter (3)
Pepper
Nutmeg
Stock (4)
Lard or Butter
Flour
Cream, heavy
Egg Yolk
Prep   -   (40 min)
  1. Cut CHICKEN into the size chunks appropriate for how you will be serving it (see Note-1). Not too small because you have to pick it out of the vegetables - at least 1-1/2 inches for boneless meat.
  2. Rub Chicken lightly with Salt and set aside.
  3. Cut ONION in quarters lengthwise and slice medium crosswise. Peel CARROT, PARSNIP and CELERY ROOT and cut into about 3/4 inch cubes. Mix all.
  4. Dice MUSHROOMS fairly small. Fry over low heat in 1 T BUTTER until lightly browned. Set aside.
  5. Squeeze LEMON for juice and hold aside. Cut a 1-1/2 inch square of the Peel - yellow part only, and set aside.
  6. Chop Parsley fine.
Run   -   (2-1/4 hr)
  1. Heat Lard in a spacious sauté pan (it will just fit in a 3-1/2 quart sauté. Stir in Chicken, then Vegetable mix. Boil off the water and fry tumbling frequently until all is lightly browned. Watch the fond that sticks to the pan - if it's getting too dark, go to the next step right away. It should be reddish brown, not chocolate brown.
  2. Stir in Pepper, Nutmeg, reserved Lemon Peel and 1-1/2 c Stock. Cover tightly and simmer over low heat until Chicken is tender (about 30 minutes), tumbling now and then and checking liquid. Don't get it too tender or it'll fall apart when you try to remove it from the vegetables.
  3. Remove Chicken and set aside, leaving Vegetables in the pan.
  4. Press the Vegetables in a wire strainer to recover all liquid. Discard the solids. If the vegetables are too dry to strain well, heat with a little extra water before straining. Scrape any pulp that is on the underside of the strainer into the liquid and return the liquid to the pan.
  5. Melt 3 T Butter and fry Flour in it, stirring almost constantly, until it darkens a bit and you have a blonde roux.
  6. Start stirring pan liquid into the Roux until you have a smooth paste. Add boiling water if needed to get a loose sauce.
  7. Return Sauce to the sauté pan and stir in Mushrooms, Parsley and Cream. Simmer about 5 minutes and check salt to taste.
  8. Stir Chicken back in. Adjust liquid with boiling water as needed to get a rather loose sauce. Keep in mind it will thicken considerably when cooled to serving temperature. Bring up to a simmer.
  9. When about ready to serve, stir in Egg Yolk, then Lemon Juice to taste (I use 1 T or a little more). Serve hot.
NOTES:
  1. Chicken:   Weight is skinless, boneless, preferably thigh/leg meat for better texture and flavor. The pattern recipe called for a whole 4 pound chicken cut up into serving pieces. I find skinless, boneless easier to cook and much better for buffet service. It can also be more equitably divided at the family table. Skin-on may provide flavor, but I get that flavor from the stock (see Note-4).
  2. Celery Root:   [Celeriac] This vegetable is now available in many produce markets, at least here in California. If you are not familiar with it, see our Celery Root page.
  3. Lard:   Lard is the traditional frying medium used by Czechs. The American Heart Association so villainized it Americans are afraid to use it, but it's not nearly as dangerous as the trans fats they urged us to use instead. It has a better health profile than butter, and is now increasingly used by top chefs. For details see our Lard page. While Butter is not traditional you can use it if you feel you can't use lard - or you can use Pure Olive Oil (not virgin), or, better, Avocado oil.
  4. Stock:   The pattern recipe called for water, but stock makes a richer dish. I make the stock with the skins and bones I strip from the thighs I use for the meat. For details see our Soup Stock / Broth page.
  5. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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