Bowl of Malabar Spinach and Shrimp
(click to enlarge)

Malabar Spinach & Shrimp
China
  -   Saan Choy
Serves:
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
4 side  
**
20 min  
Some

Malabar Spinach is popular all over Southeast Asia, Southern China, Southern India and tropical Africa, regions too warm for regular spinach. For a Vietnamese touch, replace salt with 1/2 T Fish Sauce.



1
5
2
1
1/4
2
1
1/4
2
1
#
oz
oz
cl
in
T
T
T
T
t
Saan Choy (1)  
Shrimp
Salted Fish (2)
Garlic
Ginger root
Rice Wine (3)
Oyster Sauce
Salt
Oil
Sesame Oil
Prep   -   (20 min)
  1. Rinse SAAN CHOY well. Break up vines into convenient lengths, discarding overly thick stems and removing large leaves from stems.
  2. Shell SHRIMP. Leave whole or cut in half depending on size and your preference.
  3. Slice SALTED FISH very thin. Don't worry if it breaks up.
  4. Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Slice GINGER very thin and chop fine. Mix.
  5. Mix Rice Wine, Oyster Sauce and Salt.
RUN   -   (12 min)
  1. In a wok heat Oil over moderate heat and fry Salted Fish stirring until lightly browned. Remove the fish with a slotted spoon and set aside. Crumble it if it hasn't already broken into small pieces.
  2. Stir in Garlic mix and fry stirring for a moment, then add Shrimp and fry stirring until just turning pink, then stir in Saan Choy until coated with oil.
  3. Stir in Rice Wine mix and stir over moderately high heat until Spinach is wilted and a uniform cooked color. Don't overcook or it'll become slimy.
  4. Adjust liquid if needed, sprinkle with Sesame Oil (dark) and Serve hot.
NOTES:
  1. Malabar Spinach:   (Mong Toi, Saan Choy) It's related to cactus, not regular spinach, but has a similar (but much milder) taste. Be careful not to overcook it - it can become slimy. For details see our Malabar Spinach page.
  2. Salted Fish:   Fillets of salted fish, often mackerel, are to be found in the freezer cases of markets serving Korean, Chinese and Southeast Asian communities. See our Salted Fish page for details.
  3. Rice Wine:   Use a good, drinkable Chinese rice wine, not that horrid salted "cooking" version. If you don't have this, use a Dry Sherry. Sake is made from rice but is not considered a good substitute. For details see our Chinese Rice Wine page.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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