Serving
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Chicken Noodle Soup
China

Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
6 soup  
**
1/2 hr  
Most
A very popular soup and adaptable to what you have on hand. In the photo the noodles are a bit green because they're wormwood (mugwort) flavored noodles from a Korean market and smoked sausage was used instead of ham.



5
8
4
7
3
1
1
1
4
1/2

oz
oz
oz
oz
T
T
T
c
t
Black Mushroom
Noodles, fresh (1)  
Bamboo Shoots
Chicken meat (2)
Ham (3)
Oil
Soy Sauce
Rice Wine
Stock (chicken)
Salt
Prep   -   (35 min - 25 min work)
  1. Soak MUSHROOMS 30 minutes in warm water. Stem and shred.
  2. Bring plenty of Water to a rolling boil over high flame, sprinkle NOODLES into the water and stir well to separate strands. When the water comes back to a boil, turn the heat down a bit and let it boil for another 4 minutes. Strain out the noodles and rinse them well with cold water so they don't stick (Chinese way) or tumble them with a few drops of oil (my way). Drain and set aside.
  3. Shred BAMBOO SHOOTS and mix with Mushrooms.
  4. If using raw CHICKEN cut into slivers and parboil 2 minutes. Drain and set aside. If cooked, just tear it into shreds (see Note-2).
  5. Shred HAM and add to Chicken.
Run   -   (15 min)
  1. Heat Oil in a heavy bottomed pot and stir in Mushroom mix. Fry stirring for a couple of minutes.
  2. Stir in Soy Sauce and Rice Wine, then Stock and Salt. Bring to a boil and simmer 2 minutes.
  3. Stir in Chicken mix, bring back to a boil and simmer 5 minutes (less if using cooked chicken).
  4. Stir in Noodles and simmer until done - 2 to 5 minutes depending on the noodles.
  5. Serve hot with both spoons and chopsticks (for handling the noodles). Use tongs to transfer noodles to individual bowls, then a ladle for the liquid.
NOTES:
  1. Noodles:   Fresh noodles can be made at home or found in the refrigerated section of Asian markets and some supermarkets. I avoid those dyed yellow for soup. I've had good luck with the fairly firm hanks sold in Korean markets.
  2. Chicken:   The weight given is for boneless uncooked. In China cooked chicken would likely be used. If you have cooked chicken use 5 ounces and tear it into shreds.
  3. Ham:   The Chinese prefer dry cure (Virginia / country) ham, because it's close to what they use in China. Asian markets sell it in individual thick slices but its not much available in supermarkets. I have used the lean part from smoked bacon ends and pieces, cut up smoked sausages and regular ham, all with good results.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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