Serving
(click to enlarge)

Pork & Yu Choy Stir-fry
China

Serves:
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
2 main  
**
32 min  
Prep
This very tasty stir-fry is basically Yu Choy Stir-fry made with marinated pork to convert it to a main dish. Shanghai bok choy (sold as "baby bok choy") also works very well in this recipe. For a Chicken version See also Chicken Yu Choy Stir-fry.



12
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1
1/2
1
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12
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1/2
1
1/4
1
1/2
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2
oz
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T
T
T
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oz
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T
T
c
T
t
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T
Pork, lean (1)
-- Marinade
Soy Sauce
Rice Wine (2)
Corn Starch
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Yu Choy (2)
-- Sauce
Soy Sauce
Oyster Sauce
Stock
Rice Wine (2)
Salt
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Oil
Prep   (20 min)
  1. Slice Pork about 1/8 inch and cut into strips 1/2 inch wide and up to 2 inches long. Unlike beef pork should be cut with the grain when cut thin.
  2. Mix all Marinade items and Massage into Pork. Set aside to marinate for 1/2 hour or more.
  3. Rinse Yu Choy and cut it whichever way you like. Stems do not need to be held separate unless they are quite large but I usually do anyway.
  4. Mix All Sauce items.
RUN   (12 min)
  1. In a wok or spacious sauté pan heat Oil and stir in Pork. Fry stirring over high flame until it has completely lost its raw color. The cornstarch will start to stick to the pan, be careful it does not burn because it will become part of the sauce.
  2. Stir in Yu Choy Stems (if separate) and fry stirring about 1-1/2 minutes, then stir in Leaves until coated with oil.
  3. Stir in Sauce Mix and bring to a boil. Scrape material stuck to the pan into the sauce. Simmer covered, turning frequently, until Yu Choy stems are crisp tender, about 3 minutes..
  4. Serve hot with plenty of steamed long grain rice.
NOTES:
  1. Pork:   Weight is for boneless with all excess fat trimmed away. Just about any cut can be used.
  2. Yu Choy:   This is an edible version of the plant that produces the seeds canola oil is made from. It is now widely grown in North America and readily available in most markets serving an East or Southeast Asian community. For details see our Yu Choy page. You can use other forms of choy as alternatives, and Shanghai bok choy (sold as "baby bok choy") is particularly good, but for other choys, give the stems more of a lead over the leaves in cooking. For details see our Cabbage Greens page.
  3. Rice Wine:   Use a good, drinkable Chinese rice wine, not that horrid salted "cooking" version. If you don't have this, use a Dry Sherry. Sake is made from rice but is not considered a good substitute. For details see our Chinese Rice Wine page.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch ar=as required tt=to taste
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