Serving
Click to Enlarge

Pork Bung Stir Fry
China / California

Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
2 main  
***
1-1/2 hr  
Prep

"Unusual" to most North Americans but a tasty treat served by street vendors from Korea south through Malaysia. I attribute this recipe to China / California because I found no recipe, but constructed my own from bits, pieces, hints and traveler's comments. Incidentally, it's pretty good.





1
10
7
2
2
3
-----
3
1
1
1/2
1/2
-----
2

#
oz
oz
cl
T

---
T
T
T
t
T
---
T

Pork Bungs (1)
Onion
Bell Pepper gn.
Garlic
Szechwan veg. (2)  
Chilis red (3)
-- Sauce
Stock
Rice Wine (4)
Soy Sauce
Salt
Cornstarch
-------------
Oil
Prep   (15 min + 1 hr 20 min simmer)
  1. Simmer PORK BUNGS in plenty of water for 1 hour and 20 minutes or until sufficiently tender. Drain. Slice diagonally about 3/4 inch wide, then split the large end pieces in half so they are similar in bulk to the small end pieces.
  2. Slice ONION into narrow strips lengthwise. Slice BELL PEPPER into similarly sized slices. Mix.
  3. Crush GARLIC and chop small.
  4. Core CHILIS and slice into thin strips. Rinse SZECHWAN VEG. and cut into narrow strips. Mix.
  5. Mix all Sauce items.
Run   (10 min)
  1. In a wok or spacious sauté pan heat Oil to nearly smoking. Stir in Onion Mix and fry stirring over very high heat until just crisp tender. If your pan is hot enough to get some char spots on the onion and pepper strips all the better.
  2. Stir in Garlic, then Pork Bungs and Chili mix. Fry stirring just long enough to heat through.
  3. Stir in the Sauce mix and bring to a boil. Simmer stirring until it thickens a bit,
  4. Serve hot with plenty of steamed long or medium grain rice, depending on if you want to call it southern (long) or northern (medium).
NOTES:
  1. Pork Bung:   This is the rectum and large intestine of a pig. They are commonly carried in the frozen food cases of markets serving East and Southeast Asian communities. For details see our Pork Bung page.
  2. Szechwan Vegetable:   This is a pickled mustard stalk, usually found canned in North America, whole or cut into strips. Other preserved mustard greens could also be used. For details see our Szechwan Vegetable page.
  3. Chilis:   Around here everyone uses Fresnos, but other medium hot red or green chilis can be used. For details see our Chili Page.
  4. Rice Wine:   Use a good, drinkable Chinese rice wine, not that horrid salted "cooking" version. If you don't have this, use a Dry Sherry. Sake is made from rice but is not considered a good substitute. For details see our Chinese Rice Wine page.
  5. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
cmm_pigbung1 100118 var   -   www.clovegarden.com
©Andrew Grygus - agryg@aaxnet.com - Linking to and non-commercial use of this page is permitted.