Serving
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Beef with Chinese Broccoli
China

Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
3 main  
***
55 min  
Prep
Beef and Gai Lan (Chinese broccoli) is a common combination in southeastern China and farther south. It most often includes oyster sauce which counters the very slight bitterness of the broccoli. Since I serve this as a single main dish with rice, I keep the sauce more liquid than for a Chinese style serving.






12
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1
2
2
1/4
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1
2
1/3
3
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1/2
1
2
1/3
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2
1/4
oz
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t
T
T
t
---
#
cl
in

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c
t
T
t
---
T
t
Beef, lean (1)
-- Marinade
Soy Sauce
Rice Wine (2)  
Cornstarch
Pepper, black
---------
Gai Lan (3)
Garlic
Ginger Root
Scallions
-- Sauce
Stock
Soy Sauce
Oyster Sauce
Salt
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Oil
Sesame Oil.
Prep   -   (40 min)
  1. Slice BEEF across the grain into strips about 1/8 inch thick and about 1/2 inch wide.
  2. Mix all Marinade items and massage into Beef. Let stand for at least 20 minutes.
  3. Strip leaves and tender tops from GAI LAN. Cut leaves into fairly large pieces. Split large stems in half lengthwise and cut all diagonally (including leaf stems) to lengths of about 1-1/2 inches. Keep leaves and stems separate.
  4. Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Slice GINGER very thin and chop fine. Slice SCALLIONS, white and light green parts, thin on a diagonal. Mix all.
  5. Slice dark green Scallion tops about 1/4 inch wide and set aside.
  6. Mix together all Sauce items.
Run   -   (15 min)
  1. In a wok or spacious sauté pan heat Oil and fry Garlic mix stirring until garlic threatens to color, then stir in Beef. Fry stirring until beef has lost its raw color, being careful the fond that sticks to the pan does not burn, because it is the thickener for the dish.
  2. Stir in the Gai Lan Stems and fry stirring for about 3 minutes, then stir in Gai Lan Leaves and Scallion tops. Fry stirring until coated with oil.
  3. Stir in Sauce mix. Bring to a boil and simmer covered over moderately low heat just until stems are crisp tender (about 7 minutes). The largest pieces should still have decent crunch. During this time scrape up the fond to incorporate it into the sauce. Stir in more stock if needed for the desired consistency.
  4. Stir in Sesame Oil until well distributed and turn off heat.
  5. Serve hot with plenty of steamed long grain rice.
NOTES:
  1. Beef:   Use a reasonably tender cut like chuck (shoulder). Weight is with all excess fat and membranes cut away.
  2. Rice Wine:   Use a good, drinkable Chinese rice wine, not that horrid salted "cooking" version. If you don't have this, use a Dry Sherry. Sake is made from rice but is not considered a good substitute. For details see our Chinese Rice Wine page.
  3. Gai Lan:   This green looks much like Rapini, but in an odd reversal it's actually broccoli, while Rapini is turnip greens. Most other Asian "cabbages" are actually turnip greens. For details see our Chinese Broccoli page.
  4. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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