Serving
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Cauldron Beef Stew
Ireland

Serves
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:
6 soup  
**
1 hr
Most
An excellent party stew, sure to get comments. In Ireland, damaged bulls and elderly cows were eaten, and this would not be at all like our tender feed lot beef, so stewing was the way to go. See Note-3 regarding methods.




2
3
12
1
6
2
1
1
1
2
12
1/2
1
1/2
#
T
oz
cl
oz
oz
T
T
#
T
oz
T
t
t
Beef (1)  
Oil
Leek
Garlic
Carrots
Celery
Parsley
Marjoram fresh
Tomatoes
Butter
Guinness
Sugar, brown
Salt
Pepper
Prep   -   (45 min)
  1. Trim BEEF of excess fat and cut into cubes about 1-1/2 inch on a side. In a large heavy skillet heat 2 T Oil and fry half the beef until browned on all sides. Add 1 T more Oil and do the other half.
  2. Trim LEEKS down to the white, yellow and light green. Cut in half lengthwise from just below the root to the top. Spread the leaves and rinse well. Start at the top end slice them thin crosswise right down to the root end (see Photo Gallery).
  3. Crush GARLIC, slice and chop small. Mix with Leeks.
  4. Peel CARROTS and cut into 1 inch lengths. Cut CELERY into 1/4 inch slices. Chop Parsley and Marjoram small. Mix all.
  5. Scald TOMATOES 1 minute in boiling water, then quench in cold water. Peel, slice thick and cut slices into quarters.
Run   -  
  1. Heat Butter in a heavy bottomed pot and fry Leek mix over moderate heat, stirring often until soft but not at all browned.
  2. Stir in Beef, Guinness and Sugar. Add water as needed to not quite cover the beef. Bring to a boil and simmer covered for about an hour, stirring now and then.
  3. Stir in Carrot mix and Tomatoes. Season with Salt and Pepper, cover and simmer for about another hour or until beef is tender.
  4. Serve with potatoes and/or Irish soda bread.
NOTES:
  1. Beef:   Weight is boneless and with excess fat removed. I prefer chuck for having a little fat running through it but round will do fine.
  2. Method:   Originally stews like this would be made in a cauldron hanging over the hearth fire, low for the browning then raised for the stewing. Or, after browning it could be placed in hot coals with more coals over the lid. Suitable pots for this method are still made (see Photo Gallery). To imitate this method many recipes will have you make it in a heavy Dutch oven, frying on the stove top and stewing in a 350°F oven. I find it works just fine cooked in a heavy bottomed pot over a very slow burner. If it's for a party I'll pour it into a slow cooker to keep warm after it's done. Of course you could do all the stewing in the slow cooker but I haven't the patience for those things. Also for parties I'll do the frying and clean-up the night before and the stewing on party day.
  3. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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