Serving
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Pebra / Chancho en Piedra
Chile
  -   Pebra / Chancho en Piedra
Makes
Effort:
Sched:
DoAhead:  
2-1/2 cup  
**
1-1/2 hrs  
Best
This is the "must have" table condiment for the entire length of Chile. The difference between Pebra and Chancho en Piedra is the Tomatoes. Properly, Pebra has no tomatoes, but this has been widely corrupted. Many writers now call their condiment "Pebra" even though it has tomatoes in it. There are, of course, endless other variations on the basic recipe - this one is just plain delicious.




4
1-1/4
1
1/2
1/2
1
------
2
2
1/2
1/4
oz
#
cl
c
c

---
T
t
t
t
Onion, white (1)  
Tomatoes (2)
Garlic
Parsley (3)
Cilantro (3)
Chili Aji (4)
-- Dressing
Olive Oil, ExtV
Lemon Juice
Salt
Pepper
Make   -   (1-1/2 hrs - 25 min work)
  1. Chop the ONIONS fine.
  2. Scald TOMATOES 1 minute in boiling water, quench in cold water, then peel and chop fine. Mix with Onions.
  3. Crush GARLIC and chop fine. Seed CHILI and chop very fine. Mix both with Onions.
  4. Pull PARSLEY and CILANTRO leaves from stems and chop fine. Mix with Onions.
  5. Mix all Dressing items, then tumble with Onion mix. Refrigerate for at least an hour to blend flavors. Overnight is fine.
  6. Serve in a bowl as a table condiment, for use with bread, meats, potatoes or whatever have you.
NOTES:
  1. Onions:   Some recipes use Scallions (green part and all) rather than regular Onions.
  2. Tomatoes:   As mentioned above, if tomatoes are included it is properly called Chancho en Piedra. Tomatoes are always peeled in Chile, even for salads.
  3. Herbs:   Measure is after chopping fine, lightly packed. Recipes commonly call for "1 bunch flat leaf parsley and 1 bunch Cilantro", but their photos all look like they have almost no herbs in them. Either they cheated for the photos or they have awfully small bunches where they live. From Southern California produce stores, a "bunch" yields at least 1/3 cup and up to 1/2 cup of chopped leaves. Note that some recipes call for just 1 bunch of one or the other.
  4. Chili Aji:   The proper chili in Chile is the yellow Aji Amarillo. Those are still nearly impossible to get fresh in North America, even here in Los Angeles. Aji Amarillo paste is quite easy to find in Latino markets, whole Aji Amarillo in cans and jars can also be found, and a few markets have bags of them frozen. Any of these products will work in this recipe. If you don't have any of these, Some suggest an orange Habanero - similar flavor but waaaay hotter. Use your own best judgement as to how much. for details see our Aji Amarillo page.
  5. U.S. measure: t=teaspoon, T=Tablespoon, c=cup, qt=quart, oz=ounce, #=pound, cl=clove in=inch, ar=as required tt=to taste
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